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  • July, 2017, The Division of Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering (PMSE) of the American Chemical Society announced that Professor Stuart Croll, professor at the Department of Coatings and Polymeric Materials of the North Dakota State University, will receive the Roy W. Tess Award in Coatings for 2017. Professor Croll obtained his Ph.D. in Physics (Viscoelasticity of Polymers) at the University of Leeds (UK). He has worked in industry (Millennium Inorganic Chemicals, Sherwin Williams, Northern Telecom and Fosroc Construction Chemicals), in government laboratory (National Research Council, Canada) and academia (Eastern Michigan University and North Dakota State University). He has published over 95 technical papers. He has done major research on internal shrinkage stresses in coatings and was the first to demonstrate the connection between coating solidification and the glass transition temperature as controlled by solvent content and its impact on coating adhesion. He has studied the drying of latex films, network formation, adhesion, colloidal stability, the use of renewable resources, modern art conservation, physical characterization, degradation and weathering of coatings. Professor Croll received the Mattiello Lecture Award in 2012. Professor Croll will receive the Tess Award during the 254th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society in Washington, DC, August 20-24, 2017.
  • April, 2017, The Society of Rheology has announced that Professor Julia A. Kornfield, Professor of Chemical Engineering at California Institute of Technology - Caltech, is the recipient of the 2017 Bingham Medal. The award will be presented at the 89th SoR Annual Meeting, October 8-12, 2017, in Denver, Colorado. Professor Kornfield's research includes the understanding, on a molecular level, of a broad range of macroscopic properties of polymers. Molecular and microscopic aspects of polymer viscoelasticity of polymers used in fibers, plastics, elastomers, adhesives, and coatings have been studied. Application of optical, NMR and x-ray techniques have been used to observe order and dynamics in polymers, including associative polymers, block copolymers, liquid-crystalline polymers, semicrystalline polymers and polymer gels.
  • April, 2017, William W. Graessley, Professor of Chemical Engineering, Emeritus, passed away on February 18, in Evanston, IL at the age of 83. Graessley held two positions in industry (Airco, Exxon) and two in academia (Northwestern, Princeton) He was Professor of Chemical Engineering at Princeton from 1987-1998. He advised 31 Ph.D. students and helped build the Princeton Materials Institute and the Princeton Center for Complex Materials. He was a pioneer of “molecular rheology”, connecting the deformation and flow behavior of polymeric materials to their underlying macromolecular architecture, with a particular emphasis on the role of entanglements. Amongst the many awards Graessley received in recognition of his scholarly contributions were the Bingham Medal of the Society of Rheology (1979); the Polymer Physics Prize of the American Physical Society (1990); election to the National Academy of Engineering (1990); and election to the inaugural class of Fellows of the Society of Rheology (2015). Graessley authored two books titled “Polymeric Liquids & Networks: Structure and Properties” (2004) and “Polymeric Liquids & Networks: Dynamics and Rheology” (2008).
  • March, 2017, The Society of Rheology has announced that Professor Aditya Khair, Associate Professor, Chemical Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University, is the recipient of the 2017 Arthur B. Metzner Early Career Award. The award will be presented at the 89th SoR Annual Meeting to be held October 8-12, 2017, in Denver, Colorado. Professor Khair studied as an undergraduate at Imperial College London, where he received an MEng degree in Chemical Engineering (First Class Honours) in 2001 and obtained a Certificate of Advanced Study in Mathematics from the University of Cambridge in 2002. Later that year, he began a Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering at the California Institute of Technology. In 2007, he began a postdoc in Chemical Engineering at UC Santa Barbara. In August 2010 he joined the Chemical Engineering Department at Carnegie Mellon University and in July 2015 he was promoted to Associate Professor. Professor Khair's research group uses applied mathematics and engineering sciences, e.g., scaling theory, asymptotic analysis, and numerical computation, to investigate problems in fluid dynamics, colloid science, rheology, electrochemistry, and electrokinetics. His research ranges from charge transport in organic semiconductors to the fluid mechanics of swimming organisms.
  • January, 2017, The American Coatings Association (ACA) announced that Dr. Jamil Baghdachi, Professor of Polymers and Coatings at the Eastern Michigan University, will deliver the Mattiello Memorial Lecture at its CoatingsTech Conference, March 20-22, 2017, in Cleveland, Ohio. Dr. Baghdachi’s lecture is titled “Smart and Functional Polymers and Coatings.” Dr. Baghdachi has over 30 years of experience in all aspects of polymers, coatings, adhesives, paints, and composites. Dr. Baghdachi serves on the editorial board of ACA’s Journal of Coatings Technology and Research. In 1997 he authored the FSCT’s “Adhesion Aspects of Polymeric Coatings” monograph. That same year he became a professor of Polymer and Coatings at Eastern Michigan University. He has also worked in industry, as president of Innovative Technology Systems Corporation, at ARCO Chemical, DuPont, and BASF’s Coatings and Colorants Division. Dr. Baghdachi has 38 patents, authored or co-author five technical books and published 122 technical publications. He received the Roy W. Tess Award in 2015, ACS Fellow in 2014, and ACA’s Industry Excellence Award in 2012. He is an active member of the Society of Automotive Engineers, Society of Manufacturing Engineers, past chair of the ACS Polymeric Materials Science and Engineering Division, and organizer and general chair of the Smart Coatings Conference. Dr. Baghdachi received his B.S. in Chemistry and M.S. in Organic Chemistry from Middle Tennessee State University in 1975 and 1978, respectively and his Ph.D. from The University of Mississippi, Oxford, in 1982.
  • August, 2016, The editors of the Journal of Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics and Elsevier announce the Ken Walters Prize. This annual award recognizes the best paper published within the calendar year. The award is named in honor of professor Ken Walters FRS. The inaugural 2016 prize will be announced and presented in 2017.
  • July 2016, Professor Egon Matijevic, 94, died on July 20 in Potsdam, N.Y. Professor Matijevic, the Victor K. LaMer Professor Emeritus, Clarkson University, inspired excellence in the laboratory, the classroom and in life. He was a world-renowned researcher with numerous publications and patents, teaching at Clarkson University for nearly six decades. Professor Matijevic was born on April 27, 1922, in Otocac, Croatia. He received his bachelor of science degree in chemical engineering from the University of Zagreb in 1944, Ph.D. in chemistry in 1948 and doctor habil in 1952. Professor Matijevic began his career at Clarkson in 1957 as a post-doctoral fellow, following a year as a research fellow at Cambridge University in England. In 1965, he established the Institute of Colloid and Surface Science, the first of its kind in the U.S. and a precursor to the Center for Advanced Materials Processing. His research interests included colloid stability, interactions of colloids with complex solutes, adsorption from solutions, inorganic precipitations, monodispersed inorganic and polymer colloids, particle adhesion, colloid aspects of ceramics, interfacial aspects of corrosion, aerosols, medical diagnostics of fine particles, nanostructures, chemical mechanical polishing, and many other areas. Matijevic received many honors nationally and internationally and was the only individual to receive all three major awards of the American Chemical Society in his field of colloid chemistry: The Kendall Award (1972), the Langmuir Distinguished Lecturer Award (1985), and the Ralph K. Iler Award (1993). He was also honored with the Thomas-Graham Award in 1985, the highest prize of the oldest colloidal society in the world, Germany's Kolloid Gesellschaft. He received honorary degrees at universities worldwide, including Lehigh University, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, the University of Zagreb, the National University of San Martin, the University of Ljubljana, and Clarkson University. Matijevic published 581 papers and held 17 patents. He instructed 15,000 undergraduate students and advised more than 50 Ph.D. candidates, 50 M.S. students, and 130 postdoctoral scholars. He delivered more than 70 plenary and keynote lectures at meetings and symposia in dozens of countries worldwide, including the prestigious Faraday Discourse at the Royal Institution in London. His recent research focused on developing uniform drug particles. In 2012, he edited and contributed a chapter to a new book, Fine Particles in Medicine and Pharmacy.
  • April, 2016, The Society of Rheology has announced that Professor Michael Cates of University of Cambridge is the 2016 Bingham Medalist, and Professor Evelyne van Ruymbeke of Université catholique de Louvain is the recipient of the 2016 Arthur B. Metzner Early Career Award. The awards will be presented at the 88th SoR Annual Meeting to be held February 12-16, 2017, in Tampa, Florida.
  • February 2016, The Division of Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering (PMSE) of the American Chemical Society announced that Professor Mark Soucek of the University of Akron, Department of Polymer Engineering, will receive the Roy W. Tess Award in Coatings for 2016. Dr. Soucek began his academic career 1993 at North Dakota State University at Fargo, ND. He has 15 U.S. patents and over 150 publications. Dr. Soucek’s research interests include Latexes, Powder Coatings, UV-Curable Powder Coatings, Kinetic and Reaction Mechanism Studies of Cycloaliphatic Epoxides, Latexes Crosslinked with Cycloaliphatic Epoxides, Protective Space Coatings, High Solids and Water-Reducible Alkyds, UV-Curable Coatings, Inorganic/Organic Hybrid Coatings, Coatings from Renewable Resources. Auto-oxidative Curing Mechanism of Drying Oils, Plasma deposition of High Performance Coatings, Corrosion Resistant Polyurethane Coating, Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Catalysis. Prof. Soucek is a recognized leader in drying oil technologies especially with bio-based feedstocks and has been a leader in the renaissance of alkyd technology. His most significant contribution to coatings science and technology is his work on environmentally benign coatings based on non-petroleum feedstocks. He is also one of the leading authorities in reactive diluent technology where VOCs are replaced with bio-based liquids which dissolve the polymeric binder and also participate in film formation by reactive crosslinking reactions. Most recently Prof. Soucek has worked on isocyanate free technology using cyclic carbonates and acrylic cross-linkable, cycloaliphatic epoxides as replacements for bisphenol A in food-contactable coatings. Dr. Soucek has a long collaboration with the Air Force to replace chromium primers and coatings on steel and aluminum substrates for corrosion protection utilizing inorganic/organic hybrid coatings. Dr. Soucek will receive the Roy W. Tess Award in August, 2016 during the 252nd National Meeting of the American Chemical Society in Philadelphia, PA.

  • October 2015, Alexei Likhtman, 44, professor in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at the University of Reading, UK, died on October 11, 2015, after a fall while hiking the weekend before the 87th Annual Meeting of The Society of Rheology. Likhtman, an enthusiast for outdoor activities, tripped while visiting Annapolis Rock, part of the Appalachian mountain trail system, 35 miles west of Baltimore, MD. Likhtman was born in Moscow. He received a diploma in physics with honors from Moscow State University in 1994, and subsequently took a PhD at the same institution. Professor Likhtman moved to the UK in 1998. He worked as a lecturer at the University of Leeds between 1999 and 2007 where he collaborated with Tom McLeish. Professor Likhtman studied various aspects of linear and non-linear rheology of entangled polymers, surface tension in liquid-solid interfaces and hierarchical modeling of complex fluids. Likhtman was part of a large interdisciplinary team that was awarded the JOR Publication Award for 2006. The paper, "Contraction flows of monodisperse linear entangled polymers: Multiscale modeling and flow visualization," J. Rheol. 49, 501-522 (2005), discusses a comprehensive set of experiments that seeks to link molecularly based model calculations to observed polymer behavior.

  • July, 2015, Dr. David W. Riley, President of Extrusion Engineers, Branchburg, NJ, passed away on July 9, 2015 at the age of 94. Dr. Riley served in World War II as a Naval Deck Officer, then earned a PhD in Chemistry at Ohio State. He had been a research chemist for Goodyear, DuPont, Union Carbide, General Cable and Tenneco before founding Extrusion Engineers, which specialized in melt rheology, friction analysis and process equipment. He published frequently on topics ranging from extrusion, analytical methods, friction properties of thermoplastics, rheology of vinyl compounds, elongation flow behavior of melts to shear effects on molecular structure of polymers and their stability at very high shear rates. His work led to very substantial cost reduction in extrusion, particularly in wire and cable manufacture, as well as to ASTM methods D3364 (Melt flow analysis), D3591 (Analysis of the viscosity of PVC in formulated compounds), D5576 (Structural features in polyolefins and polyolefin copolymers) and D5477 (Polymer layers or inclusions by FTIR).
  • May, 2015, Professor Sir Sam Edwards, Cavendish Professor of Physics at Cambridge University, UK (1984-1995), a pioneer in many fields in physics and polymer science, passed away on 7 May, 2015 at the age of 87. Sir Sam Edwards was educated at the University of Cambridge and Harvard University. His work in condensed matter physics started in 1958 with a paper on the properties of disordered systems (glasses, gels, etc.) which was followed by 35 years of important contributions in the theoretical study of complex materials (polymers, gels, colloids, etc.). He was Chairman of the Science Research Council (1973-1977) and was knighted in 1975. Sir Edwards made significant contributions to the theory of the dynamics of polymers, the process known as reptation, with Masao Doi. The dynamics of reptation described by their theory proved to be very successful and had a significant effect on the field of rheology. See Masao Doi, "A Tribute to Professor Sir Sam Edwards (1928-2015)", Rheology Bulletin, 84 (2), July 2015, pp. 16-17. 
  • April , 2015, The 2015 Weissenberg Award recipient is Professor Dimitris Vlassopoulos of FORTH and the University of Crete, Heraklion, Greece. The Weissenberg Award was established in 1977 by the European Society of Rheology (ESR) to acknowledge outstanding, long term achievements in the field of rheology. To read more: http://rheology-esr.net/2015/01/13/weissenberg-award-2015-to-dimitris-vlassopoulos/
  • April, 2015, The Society of Rheology has announced that Professor Hiroshi Watanabe of Kyoto University, Japan, is the 2015 Bingham Medalist, and Professor Anson Ma of the University of Connecticut is the recipient of the 2015 Arthur B. Metzner Early Career Award. The awards will be presented at the 87th SOR Annual Meeting, October 11-15, 2015, Baltimore, MD.
  • March, 2015, Dr. Danny C. Rich, manager of Sun Chemical Corporation’s Color Research Laboratory delivered the Mattiello Memorial Lecture at the American Coatings Association (ACA) CoatingsTech Conference, March 9-11, 2015 in Louisville, KY. Dr. Rich has managed the Color Research Laboratory at Sun Chemical since 1998, focusing on research and technology assessment in color measurement, color management, and color matching in graphic arts and printing. Prior to joining Sun Chemical, he worked for Datacolor International, managing its advanced colorimetry and metrology, and developing new technology for color machine vision, coatings, plastics, and ink formulation and instrument metrology. Dr. Rich has a B.S. in Physics from the University of Idaho, an M.S. in Physics from Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University, and a Ph.D. in Chemistry (Color Science) from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.
    In addition to the prestigious Mattiello Memorial Lecture, the ACA presented the Roon Award, which recognizes exceptional technical papers, to Dr. Wenjun Wu and Dr. Christopher Miller (Arkema Coating Resins), Dr. Jihui Guo (The Dow Chemical Company), Dr. Gang Pu (Exponential Business and Technologies Company), Dr. Jilin Zhang (Noven Pharmaceuticals, Inc.) and Dr. Steve Severtson (University of Minnesota) for their paper titled “Alkali-Soluble Resins (ASR) and Acrylic Blends: Influence of ASR Distribution on Latex Film and Paint Properties.”
  • April 2014, Professor Randy Ewoldt, assistant professor at the Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, The University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign,has been awarded the 2014 Arthur B. Metzner Early Career Award by the Society of Rheology. Ewoldt received this recognition "for his outstanding contributions to the field of Large Amplitude Oscillatory Strain (LAOS) rheometry". He will receive the award at the October 2014 Meeting of the Society of Rheology in Philadelphia. The Metzner Award is given to a member of the Society of Rheology who is younger than 35 and has distinguished him/herself in rheological research, rheological practice, or service to rheology. Ewoldt and his group study rheology with a combination of experiment and theory, with an eye toward design based on rheological behavior. Specific materials of interest include polymer gels, yield stress fluids, and suspensions of actively swimming particles. Ewoldt joined UIUC in 2011 after a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Minnesota. He received PhD and MS degrees in mechanical engineering from MIT after earning a BS degree in mechanical engineering at Iowa State University.
  • March 2014, Professor Jopseph M. DeSimone, Chancellor's Eminent Professor of Chemistry at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Benjamine W. Maynor, Vice President of Research for Liquidia Technologies and Joseph P. Rolland, co-founder of Liquidia will receive the ACS Kathryn C. Hach Award for Entrepreneurial Success. The team developed a soft lithography technique - PRINT - Particle Replication In Nonwetting Templates - and launched Liquidia Technologies based on the new technique. The Award will be presented to the team at the 248th ACS Meeting in San Francisco, CA, August 10-14, 2014.
  • February 2014, The Society of Rheology announced that Professor Norman J. Wagner,  Alvin B. and Julia O. Stiles Professor at the Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Delaware is the 2014 Bingham Medalist. The award will be presented at the 86th SoR Annual Meeting, October 5-9, 2014, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
  • January 2014, Professor John Mainstone, Professor of Physics at The School of Mathematics and Physics, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia, the curator of what may be the world's longest running experiment, known as the “pitch drop”, passed away in August 2013 without ever getting to see the slow moving drip he had waited for decades to witness. Professor Mainstone took over the pitch drop experiment in 1961 from professor Thomas Parnell who started it in 1927. Three years after he sealed pitch (tar) in a funnel, professor Parnell cut off the bottom of the funnel and waited for a drop to form. Only nine droplets have formed and fallen since. The experiment and a lapse time video may be viewed through a webcam at http://smp.uq.edu.au/content/pitch-drop-experiment. A pitch drop in a similar experiment which has been run at Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland, was caught by camera on July 11, 2013 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vZ5Vm4vABH4.  
  • July 2013, Professor Krzysztof (Kris) Matyjaszewski, Professor of chemistry at Carnegie Mellon University, is the winner of the ACS Madison Marshall Award. Professor Matyjaszewski is known for his innovations in polymer chemistry, in particular, his discovery of atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). 
  • July 2013, The Society of Rheology announced that Professor Gareth H. McKinley, School of Engineering Professor of Teaching Innovation and Head of the Non-Newtonian Fluid Dynamics Research Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is the 2013 Bingham Medalist and Professor Patrick T. Underhill, Assistant Professor, Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, is the 2013 recipient of the Arthur B. Metzner Early Career Award. Both awards will be presented at the 85th SoR Annual Meeting, October 13-17, 2013, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
  • April 2013, The National Academy of Engineering (NAE) has selected Professor Nicholas Peppas, chair of the Cockrell School of Engineering Biomedical Engineering Department, and the Fletcher Stuckey Pratt Chair in Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin, as its 2012 Founders Award recipient in recognition of his pioneering work in the areas of polymer chemistry, bioengineering, pharmaceutical sciences and advanced drug delivery. Peppas has focused his work on advancing drug delivery and biomaterials with the goal of improving drug administration, efficacy and patient quality of life. His contributions have been translated into more than 20 medical products, and he holds more than 50 U.S. and international patents. In the 1980s, Peppas developed theories and equations that set the foundation for the design of drug delivery systems and biomaterials. He is known for the "Peppas-Korsmeyer Equation," which is the standard method of analysis of pharmaceutical formulations or systems. One area of Peppas' focus is the delivery of responsive hydrogels — particles that are able to stay in a collapsed state until triggered by temperature, pH or other biomolecules in the body. His work with hydrogels has resulted in medical breakthroughs, including oral delivery systems for diabetes, controlled-release treatments for heart problems and the development of new biomaterials for artificial organs. The NAE will present the award to Peppas at a ceremony Sunday, September 30, 2013, in Washington, D.C.
  • March 2013, Professor Gordon P. Bierwagen, of the Department of Coatings and Polymeric Materials, North Dakota State University, will receive the Roy W. Tess Award in Coatings for 2013. The award is given annually by the ACS Division of Polymeric Materials: Science & Engineering (PMSE) and recognizes outstanding achievements in coatings science, technology, and engineering. Dr. Bierwagen began his career in the coatings industry in 1969 working as a Research Chemist in the Electrochemical Engineering Department of Battelle Memorial Institute. In 1969 he joined Sherwin Williams as Senior Chemist and later became Laboratory Director. In 1987 he joined Avery Decorative Films Division as Director of R&D. In 1989 he joined the Polymer and Coatings Department of North Dakota State University as Professor. He was chair of the Department for ten years and is currently Director of the Center for Surface Protection. Dr. Bierwagen received his Ph.D. in physical chemistry at Iowa State University. He received a B.S. degree in chemistry and mathematics at Valparaiso University. His research activities are in the areas of coatings formulation concepts and corrosion. Dr. Bierwagen has been the leader in the invention of magnesium rich coatings to protect aluminum alloys against corrosion. Dr. Bierwagen has published over 160 peer-reviewed publications, edited the ACS Symposium Series volume 689 on Organic Coatings for Corrosion Control, and has a recent patent and four pending related to coatings corrosion control of metal substrates. He has been Editor-in-Chief of Progress in Organic Coatings journal for 16 years. Dr. Bierwagen has won two Roon Foundation awards for best paper in 1972 and 2003. He was the 2007 Mattiello Lecture Award winner for the American Coatings Association. Dr. Bierwagen will receive the Tess Award on Monday, September 9, 2013, at the 246th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society in Indianapolis, IN.
  • January 2013, Professor Steve Granick, Founder Professor of Engineering at the Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, is the 2013 recipient of the ACS Award in Colloid & Surface Chemistry. Granick received a bachelor's degree in sociology from Princeton University in 1978 before heading to the University of Wisconsin, Madison, for a Ph.D. with famed polymer scientist John D. Ferry. From Wisconsin, Granick moved to the Collège de France in 1983 to do a postdoc with soft matter scientist and Nobel Laureate Pierre-Gilles de Genes. Granick then held another postdoc position in 1984 at the University of Minnesota with Matthew Tirrell. He joined the faculty of the University of Illinois in 1985. His research interests are in the areas of polymers, colloids, biomaterials and imaging. Current research includes phospholipid assemblies, self assembly of novel, specially designed colloidal particles, single molecule imaging, water and hydrophobicity and living cells. Granick will present the award address before the ACS Division of Colloid & Surface Chemistry at the 245th ACS National Meeting, New Orleans, LA, April 7-11, 2013.
  • January 2013, Professor Mitchel A. Winnik, University Professor and Head of the Polymer and Colloids Group at the Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, is the 2013 recipient of the ACS Award in Applied Polymer Science, awarded to recognize and encourage outstanding achievements in the science or technology of plastics, coatings, polymer composites, adhesives, and related fields.  Professor Winnik obtained his Ph.D. in organic chemistry at Columbia University in 1969. Following a postdoctoral year at Caltech he joined the faculty at the University of Toronto in 1970 and received tenure as an organic chemist. In the late 1970’s, he switched his interest to polymer chemistry, where he and his students pioneered various applications of fluorescence spectroscopy to polymers. Among the polymer systems his research group have examined are latex films, water-soluble polymers, particularly associative thickeners, and block copolymers. Professor Winnik collaborated with coatings companies such as ICI, Union Carbide and Rohm and Haas. He developed a method to observe latex paints at the molecular while they dry. Recent interests include crystallization-driven self assembly of block copolymer micelles and biomedical applications of metal-chelating polymers. Winnik has published more than 600 papers and produced 23 patents. In 1999 he won the Roy W. Tess Award in Coatings from the ACS Division of Polymeric Materials, Science and Engineering. Professor Winnik will present the award address before the ACS Division of Polymeric Materials at the 245th ACS National Meeting, New Orleans, LA, April 7-11, 2013.
  • December 2012, TA Instruments has presented the Distinguished Young Rheologist Award to two scientists: Dr. Anson W. K. Ma, of the University of Connecticut, and Dr. Ali Mohraz, of the University of California, Irvine. The Award cited Dr. Ma’s current work on interfacial rheology of nanoparticle-laden interfaces for stabilizing emulsions, and flow dynamics of nanoparticles in simulated blood flows for cancer treatment. Professor Ma is also a recent recipient of an NSF EAGER award, given for those projects that explore potentially “transformative” ideas or approaches. Dr. Mohraz was recognized for his outstanding contributions regarding the rheology of colloidal dispersions, including the flow behavior of anisometric particles, the non-linear rheology of colloidal gels, and the structure and dynamics of polymer/colloid gels.
  • December 2012, Professor Dean Webster, Chair of the Coatings and Polymeric Materials Department at North Dakota State University (NDSU), will deliver the 2013 Mattiello Memorial Lecture at ACA’s CoatingsTech Conference, March 11- 13, 2013, Rosemont, Illinois. Dr. Webster joined NDSU’s Department of Coatings and Polymeric Materials in 2001, becoming chair of the department in January 2012. Prior to arriving at NDSU, he worked for 17 years in the coatings industry, beginning in 1984 at The Sherwin-Williams Company’s Central Research Laboratories in Chicago where he was involved in resin development for industrial coatings, as well as long-range research in new resins and crosslinking chemistry. While in Chicago, he helped develop the Coatings Technology program at DePaul University and taught a course in coatings resin technology. In 1993, he moved to Eastman Chemical Company in Kingsport, Tennessee, where he led project teams in the areas of applications development for new monomers, new chemistry for coatings systems, and polymer development for coatings. Dr. Webster has a B.S. in Chemistry and a Ph.D. in Materials Engineering Science from Virginia Tech. His current research interests include the use of biobased chemicals in high performance materials, design of new high performance polymer and coating systems; use of high throughput methods in the development of new materials; low surface energy coatings; use of nanoreinforcements; and radiation curable polymer systems. Dr. Webster has been recognized with numerous awards and citations: he is a five-time recipient of the Roon Foundation Award, and won the American Chemical Society’s prestigious Roy W. Tess Award; he has published 86 peer-reviewed articles, contributed six book-chapters, and holds 17 patents. Webster is a member of ACA, the American Chemical Society, the American Oil Chemists’ Society, and Radtech. He is currently the Editor-in-Chief of Progress in Organic Coatings.
  • September 2012, Professor Alan N. Gent, Harold A. Morton Professor Emeritus of Polymer Physics and Polymer Engineering at the University of Akron died on September 20, 2012. Professor Gent was a native of Leicester, England. He received his Ph.D. in Science from the University of London in 1955. In 1961 he joined the University of Akron as Professor and Assistant Director of the Institute of Rubber Research. He was an expert on fracture mechanics of rubber and plastics and made significant contributions to the understanding of the physics of adhesion and the fracture of rubbery, crystalline and glassy polymers. Dr. Gent served on the National Research Council panel that oversaw the redesign of the space shuttle's solid fuel rockets in the aftermath of the Challenger explosion. His work has been recognized around the world with numerous honors and awards, including the Polymer Physics Prize of the American Physics Society, the Mobay Award of the plastics industry, the Bingham Medal of the Society of Rheology, the Colwyn Medal of the Society of Plastics Engineers, the 3M Award in Adhesion Science of the Adhesion Society, NASA Public Service Medal, the Whitby Award of the Rubber Division of the American Chemical Society, the Charles Goodyear Medal of the Rubber Division of the American Chemical Society, the Tire Technology Lifetime Achievement Award and the Tire Technology International Lifetime Achievement Award. He was elected as a member of the National Academy of Engineering in 1991. He was president of the Society of Rheology from 1982-1983 and also presided over the High Polymer Division of the American Physical Society. In honor of his international recognition and service to the University of Akron, its Board of Trustees voted to change the name of the Ohio Research Scholar Professor position to the "Alan N. Gent Ohio Research Scholar Professor of Polymers".
  • May 2011, Professor Daniel Donald Joseph (1929 – 2011), Regents Professor Emeritus and Russell J. Penrose Professor Emeritus of the Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics at the University of Minnesota, passed away on 24 May, 2011. Professor Joseph was a world-renowned expert in fluid mechanics. His research included stability of fluid flow, irrotational motions of viscous and viscoelastic fluids, and direct numerical simulations of solid-liquid flows. Professor Joseph published several book on fluid dynamics and received many awards, including the Bingham Medal of the Society of Rheology (1993) and the Fluid Dynamics Prize of the American Physical Society (1999).
  • April 2011, The Society of Rheology announced that Professor Eric S. G. Shaqfeh, Professor of Chemical Engineering and of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University, is the 2011 Bingham Medalist and Dr. Richard Graham, Lecturer in applied mathematics at the University of Nottingham, is the 2011 recipient of the Arthur B. Metzner Early Career Award. Both awards will be presented at the 83rd SoR Annual Meeting, October 9-13, 2011, Cleveland, Ohio.
  • March 2011, Professor Dean C. Webster of North Dakota State University, Department of Coatings and Polymeric Materials, will receive the Roy W. Tess Award in Coatings for 2011. The award is given annually by the ACS Division of Polymeric Materials: Science & Engineering (PMSE) and recognizes outstanding achievements in coatings science, technology, and engineering. Professor Webster began his career in the coatings industry in 1984 working initially in corporate R&D and later for the Consumer Division of Sherwin-Williams in Chicago, IL, where he was involved in resin development for industrial coatings as well as long-range research in new resins and crosslinking chemistry. In 1993, he moved to Eastman Chemical Co., where he led R&D projects on the development of new monomers and polymers for coating systems. In 2001, he joined the Coatings and Polymeric Materials Department of North Dakota State University. His research at NDSU includes the synthesis and characterization of novel polymers that provide tailored performance properties. The award will be presented on August 31, 2011, during the 242nd National Meeting of the American Chemical Society in Denver, Colorado.
  • January 2011, Professor Joachim Meissner died in January 2011 after a long battle with cancer. Professor Meissner was born in Sehma/Annaberg in Saxony, Germany, in 1929. He graduated with a degree in physics in 1958. The same year, he joined the Plastic Engineering  Applications Department at BASF. In 1970 he became the leader of the Polymer Melt Rheology Group and became a major player in the field of extensional flow. In 1974, he moved to Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH) in Zurich, Switzerland as professor of polymer  physics, continuing his research on experimental methods to determine extensional flow of polymer melts. He is known as the inventor of the RME elongational rheometer, also known as the Meissner rheometer. Professor Meissner was a very much sought after lecturer, famous for his lucid and humorous presentations.
  • May 2010, The Society of Rheology has announced that Professor Tom McLeish of Durham University, UK, is the 2010 Bingham Medalist and Dr. Suzanne Fielding of Durham University, UK, is the 2010 recipient of the Arthur B. Metzner Early Career Award. Both awards will be presented at the 82nd SoR Annual Meeting to be held October 24-28, 2010 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.
  • March 2010, Professor Timothy P. Lodge, Distinguished McKnight University and Lloyd H. Reyerson Professor at the University of Minnesota, has been awarded the ACS Award in Polymer Chemistry. Professor Lodge's career has focused on the molecular-level understanding of polymer structure and dynamics, in particular multicomponent systems - copolymers, homopolymer blends, and their mixtures -- in solution and in the bulk state, using a host of experimental techniques, including structural probes, such as scattering of light, x-ray, and neutrons, and microscopy. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and rheology have been used to examine micellar structures in water, organic solvents, and ionic liquids. Professor Lodge has authored more than 250 papers and wrote the book "Polymer Chemistry" with Paul Hiemenz. He is also the editor of the ACS journal Macromolecules. Professor Lodge received the American Physical Society' Polymer Physics Prize in 2004. The ACS Award in Polymer Chemistry will be presented to Professor Lodge at the ACS meeting in San Francisco, CA, March 2010.  
  • January 2010, Dr. Willie Lau, Scientist for Dow Construction Chemicals, will present the 2010 Joseph J. Mattiello Memorial Lecture at the American Coatings Conference on Tuesday, April 13, 2010, Charlotte, NC. His presentation is entitled "Frontiers in Emulsion Polymerization for Coatings". Dr. Lau received his Ph.D. in Physical Organic Chemistry from Indiana University in 1982. He spent a year as a visiting professor at University of Houston and joined the Rohm and Haas Company in 1984. He began his career in the polymer synthesis area, focusing on emulsion polymerization for coatings applications. Subsequently, he led a synthetic group in the development of solvent-free rheology modifiers for waterborne coatings formulations. Following a period in the Exploratory Research Division, he returned to coatings research in 2005. Upon the merger of Rohm and Haas Company with The Dow Chemical Company in 2009, Dr. Lau was named to his current position. Dr. Lau's main research interests have been in novel polymers and materials design through synthetic methods and fundamental understanding of polymer systems including controlled radical polymerization, emulsion polymerization, controlled structure polymers applications, structure property relationship, and latex film formation. His current area of exploration involves the use of recycled materials in polymer/rubber composites by combing acrylic polymer with ground tire rubber to create a useful thermoplastic material. The polymer/rubber composites behave as reinforced thermoplastic materials that can be processed by conventional thermoforming methods into a wide variety of value-added products. Dr. Lau received the American Chemical Society Middle Atlantic Regional Industrial Innovation Award in 2005 and the Federation of Societies for Coatings Technology's Roon Foundation Award in 2007. He is a two-time recipient of the Otto Haas Award, a scientific achievement award honoring Rohm and Haas scientists whose breakthrough, innovative contributions feature state-of-the-art research content that produces significant value for the company. He has been an active member of the American Chemical Society for 38 years. Author of 40 papers and publications, he holds over 40 patents in many areas of coatings technology.
  • November, 2009, Professor James L. White, Bingham medalist and Harold A. Morton Professor of Polymer Engineering at the University of Akron passed away suddenly on November 26, 2009 at the age of 71 while on a trip in Germany. Professor White studied chemical engineering at the Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute and received MS and PhD degrees from the University of Delaware. At the University of Delaware White and Arthur Metzner developed the rheological model that bears their names. This model is widely used for polymer processing simulation. His career started in industry working for the Uniroyal Company as a research engineer and then a group leader from 1963 to 1967. In 1967 he joined the University of Tennessee as an associate professor. At the University of Tennessee he originated the Polymer Science and Engineering M.S. and Ph.D. degree programs and founded the Journal of Polymer Engineering, serving as Editor-in-Chief until 1984.
    In 1983 he moved to the University of Akron where he founded the Institute and Department of Polymer Engineering. His activities there focused on rubber processing and comounding. In 1985 Professor White founded the Polymer Processing Society and journal International Polymer Processing, serving as Editor-in-Chief from 1986 until 2004. Professor White published over 500 papers and eight books on subjects ranging form rheology, twin-screw extrusion, rubber, polyolefins, polymer compounds and thermoplastic elastomers. He received numerous awards including the Bingham Medal in 1981 and the Yoko-Sho Award from the Society of Rheology, Japan in 1984.
  • November, 2009, Dr. Joseph M. Starita died on November 17, 2009 at the age of 65, following a valiant fight with brain cancer. He was president of CPP Engineering, LLC and was the founder of Rheometrics, INC. (acquired by TA Instruments, Inc. in 2003) a leading manufacturer of rheological testing instruments. Previously, he held product, process and materials development managerial positions with General Electric. Dr. Starita received his ME from Stevens Institute of Technology and earned his MSE, MA and Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from Princeton University. Dr. Starita was a Society of Plastics Fellow and was recognized worldwide as an expert in applying rheology to solve polymer process, material and product problems. He held many patents associated with rheology and polymers.
  • October, 2009, Professor Gerald G. Fuller, Fletcher Jones II Professor of Chemical Engineering at Stanford University received the Distinguished Service Award of The Society of Rheology on October 19, 2009 at the Annual Meeting in Madison, Wisconsin. Professor Fuller's research areas include the dynamics and structure of complex, fluid-fluid interfaces subjected to flow, using optical probes such as polarimetry, Brewster angle microscopy and fluorescence microscopy to probe the response of the microstructure of Langmuir monolayers to hydrodynamic forces and measuring the mechanical properties of the films using a “needle” surface viscometer. Professor Fuller received the Bingham Medal of the Society of Rheology in 1997 and was President of the Society of Rheology in 1999. Professor Fuller is the author of over 200 publications and the book "Optical Rheometry of Complex Fluids". He has been active in many committees such as the Bingham Award, the nominating, the international and the technical program committees and was praised for organizing the International Congress on Rheology in Monterey, California in 2008.
  • July, 2009, Jonathan P. Rothstein, Associate Professor in the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering at University of Massachusetts, Amherst has been named the first recipient of the Arthur B. Metzner Early Career Award. Dr. Rothstein received his B. Eng at The Cooper Union, M.SC. at Harvard University and Ph.D. at MIT. His research areas include the dynamics of complex fluids, laminar and turbulent drag reduction, the development and utilization of superhydrophobic surfaces, shear and extensional rheology of a number of different complex fluids, non-Newtonian fluid dynamics, microfluidics, nanotechnology, non-isothermal flows, hydrodynamic stability and polymer processing. The committee cited the balance between an experimental approach and a theoretical approach that makes Rothstein's papers of such high impact and the support from his former and current students, indicating that he is passing on his expertise and passion to a new group of young rheologists.
  • July, 2009, Professor Gregory B. McKenna, Paul Whitfield Horn Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering at Texas Tech University, has been named the 2009 Bingham Medalist. He will receive the award at the 81st Annual Meeting of the society of Rheology, October 18 - 22, 2009, in Madison, Wisconsin. Professor McKenna received his Bachelors degree in Engineering Mechanics at the U.S. Air Force Academy, Masters Degree in composite materials at MIT and Ph.D. in Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Utah. He served as a test and evaluation engineer at Hill Air Force Base in Ogden, Utah. Dr. McKenna then moved to the then National Bureau of Standards as a National Research Council Postdoc and then accepted a permanent position as a staff scientist at NBS (now NIST). He was the head of the Structure and Mechanics Group in the Polymers Division at NIST until 1999 when he became Professor in Chemical Engineering at Texas Tech University. Professor McKenna has earned a reputation as a pioneering researcher in four major areas of polymer and plastics science and technology: Physical Aging and Structural Recovery of Polymer Glasses, Solid Mechanics and Nonlinear Viscoelasticity of Polymers, Thermodynamics and Mechanics of Elastomers and Gels and Molecular Rheology. The committee cited McKenna's development of novel rheological experiments and methods to interrogate the physics of polymers and complex fluids. His contricutions to rheology have been made in four areas: nanorheology and surface rheological methods, nonlinear viscoelasticity and rejuvenation of polymer glasses, molecular rheology and rheological characterization of polymer heterogeneity and mechanics and thermodynamics of cross linked rubbers.
  • February, 2009, The ACS Division of Polymeric Materials: Science & Engineering (PMSE) has named its 2009 fellows. They are Christopher K. Ober, Craig J. Hawker, Garth Wilkes, Lon J. Mathias, and Alex Jen. They will be inducted as the ninth class of PMSE fellows during the spring ACS national meeting in Salt Lake City. Ober is interim dean of engineering and Francis Bard Professor of Materials Science & Engineering at Cornell University. His interests lie in polymers, lithographic materials for microelectronics and biotechnology, and new environmentally and biologically friendly materials. Hawker is director of the Materials Research Laboratory at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is studying the interface between organic and polymer chemistry with an emphasis on the design, synthesis, and application of well-defined macromolecular structures in biotechnology, microelectronics, and surface science. Wilkes is University Distinguished Emeritus Professor of Chemical Engineering at Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University, where he studies the structure-property behavior of polymeric materials. Mathias is a professor of polymer science and engineering at the University of Southern Mississippi. His research ranges from traditional polymer synthesis and characterization to biomaterials and biobased monomers and polymers. Jen has made pioneering contributions in the fields of electronics and of molecular engineering of polymer photonics. He is the Boeing-Johnson Chair Professor in the department of materials science and engineering at the University of Washington, Seattle.
  • February, 2009, Allan L. Smith, professor emeritus of chemistry at Drexel University, died on Dec. 9, 2008, in Orleans, Mass. He partnered with an engineering colleague to obtain National Science Foundation funding for a new approach to the teaching of chemistry to engineering freshman, helping to form the basis for Drexel's "E4" engineering program. Smith authored or coauthored more than 60 papers on sophisticated small-molecule spectroscopy, sulfur allotropes, oscillating reactions, and fullerenes. Smith developed and patented the concept and design of the quartz crystal microbalance/heat conduction calorimeter ("QCM/HCC") to study thin films, nanomaterials and surface reactions. In 2001 He founded Masscal Scientific Instruments.
  • February, 2009, Frank Edward Filisko, Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Michigan, died on November 11, 2008. He received a BA in physics and math from Colgate University, MS in solid state physics from Purdue University and a PhD in polymer physics from Case Western Reserve University. He joined the Department of Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering at the University of Michigan in 1970. His research interests included mechanical and thermodynamic properties of polymer melts and solutions, biomaterials and dental composites. Professor Filisko is well known for his pioneering work on electrorheological fluids.
  • January 2009, Federation of Societies for Coatings Technology (FSCT) announced that Drs. Ad Overbeek will present the prestigious 2009 Joseph J. Mattiello Memorial Lecture at the 2009 CoatingsTech Conference, April 27-29, Indianapolis, IN. His presentation is entitled "Polymer Heterogeneity in Waterborne Coatings." Ad Overbeek graduated cum laude in 1983 from the University of Utrecht, the Netherlands. He began his industrial career in 1984, working on coating formulations for two-component isocyanate curing and special effect coatings for an industrial paint company. He joined Polyvinyl Chemistry, where he became research manager in 1986. Main research areas included room temperature crosslinking; hybrid dispersions, especially urethane/acrylate dispersions; and adhesion to untreated poly-propylene. In 1997, Drs. Overbeek was appointed business research associate within Zeneca Resins and then, in 2001, was named senior research associate of NeoResins. His primary research focus was on improved wet adhesion, zero-VOC coatings, and improved rheology of waterborne dispersions. He currently serves as waterborne competence manager of DSM as well as global science manager of DSM NeoResins. Over the last few years, his research has focused on low-VOC, high gloss and alkyd-like performance of waterborne coatings, with emphasis on the appearance of a solvent-based alkyd from an aqueous paint. Drs. Overbeek has authored over 20 papers and publications and holds 55 patents in many areas of coatings technology.
  • January 2009, Professor Jacob N. Israelachvili, professor of chemical engineering and materials at the University of California, Santa Barbara is the recipient of the 2009 ACS Award in Colloid & Surface Chemistry. Professor Israelachvili received his Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge in 1972. Following postdoctoral studies at Cambridge and Stockholm University and 12 years as a research scientist at the Australia National University, he joined UC Santa Barbara in 1986. His research has involved study of molecular and interfacial forces. He has contributed significantly to the understanding of colloid dispersions, biological systems, and polymer engineering applications. Currently, he is studying interfacial phenomena, the physics of thin films and fundamental questions in rheology and tribology of surfaces. Professor Israelachvili is best known for developing the surface forces apparatus (SFA). Professor Isrelachvili was elected as a foreign associate of the National Academy of Engineering in 1996 and to the National Academy of Sciences in 2004. He is also a fellow of the Australian Academy of Science and the Royal Society of London. Professor Israelachvili has been recognized by the Adhesion Society and the Materials Research Society for his work on adhesion and friction. He has published more than 300 papers and is the author of a textbook titled “Intermolecular and Surface Forces.”
  • July 2008, Vladimir Entov, Head of Laboratory and Leading Scientist at the Laboratory for Dynamics of Complex Fluids, the Institute of Problems in Mechanics, Moscow, passed away in Washington, DC on 10 April 2008. His is known as the progenitor of the microfilament thinning rheometer. He spent part of the year fulfilling his teaching and research commitments in Moscow and the rest of the year as an advisor and visiting scientist at Stanford, CNRS, the Technion, DAMTP, Worcester Polytechnic Institute and MIT. His work focused on problems of geomechanics, the role of fingering instabilities in enhanced oil recovery, complex liquids such as fracturing fluids, proppants and drilling muds. He worked in recent years in collaboration with the Schlumberger Research Center in Moscow. Professor Entov co-authored twelve books, edited two books and co-authored over two hundred technical reports. Professor Entov was an Editor of the European Journal of Applied Mathematics from 1994 to 2007.
  • July 2008, Professor John L. Schrag, Emeritus Professor of Chemistry at the University of Wisconsin - Madison, died 7 February 2008. Professor Schrag received his Ph. D. from Oklahoma State University in physics in 1967 and was a professor of analytical chemistry at the University of Wisconsin for 33 years. He was a founding member of the Rheology Research Center. His research focused on the experimental determination of the influence of chemical structure, polymer-solvent and polymer-polymer interactions on the conformational dynamics of macromolecules in solution. 
  • July 2008, Professor Charles F. Curtiss, Bingham Medalist (1987) and expert in molecular transport phenomena, died 24 December, 2007 in Madison, Wisconsin. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin - Madison in 1948 and joined its faculty in 1949. He published over 140 technical papers and co-authored two books: "Molecular Theory of Gases and Liquids" and "Dynamics of Polymeric Liquids: Volume 2, Kinetic Theory".
  • July 2008, Professor Hans Christian Ottinger, Head of the Polymer Physics Department, The Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zurich has been named the 2008 Bingham Medalist. He will receive the award at the XVth International Congress on Rheology, Monterey, California in August. The Bingham Medal is an annual award for outstanding contributions to the field of rheology. Professor Ottinger received his Ph.D. in Physics at the University of Freiburg, Germany. He was a post-doctoral student at the University of Wisconsin - Madison. His research in the field of complex fluids may be grouped into two areas: kinetic theory and stochastic simulation techniques and non-equilibrium thermodynamics. In addition, Professor Ottinger has been involved in several projects in the field of rheometry of polymeric liquids and complex flow fluid dynamics. Professor Ottinger has also co-organized a series of international workshops on non-equilibrium thermodynamics and complex fluids. 
  • June 2008, Dr. Frederick (“Fritz”) H. Walker of Air Products and Chemicals Inc., FSCT past president, will present the 2008 Joseph J. Mattiello Memorial Lecture at the 2008 FutureCoat! Conference, to be held October 15–16, 2008, Chicago, IL. Dr. Walker is the Intellectual Asset Manager for Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. His presentation is entitled "Dimethyl Secondary Amine Chain Extenders: A Conceptual Approach to In-Situ Generation of Advanced Epoxy Resins for Rapid Cure, Low VOC Coatings."
  • June 2008, Charles E. Bunch,  Chairman and CEO of PPG Industries and National Paint and Coatings Association (NPCA)'s outgoing Chairman of the Board of Directors, received the George Baugh Heckel Award. 
  • March 2008, Dr. John C. Weaver passed away in January 2008 at his home in Cleveland, OH at the age of 99. Dr. Weaver received his B.Sc. from Denison University and earned his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Cincinnati. He joined Sherwin-Williams in 1936 and retired as director of research in 1974. He continued to serve as a consultant and as an adjunct professor at Case Western Reserve University. He was a member of the FSCT, serving as the technical editor of the Journal of Paint Technology, member of the Board of Directors and numerous committees. He received the George Baugh Heckel Award in 1969. He served on the ASTM Board of Directors and was highly influential within its D01 Committee on Paints and Related Coatings, Materials and Applications. An ASTM Fellow, Dr. Weaver received numerous awards from the ASTM.
  • February 2008, Dr. Clifford K. Schoff, formerly of PPG Industries and now a private consultant is the winner of the 2008 Roy W. Tess Award in Coatings. The award is given annually by the ACS Division of Polymeric Materials: Science & Engineering and recognizes outstanding achievements in coatings science, technology, and engineering. Dr. Schoff is recognized as one of the world's leading experts in the area of coatings defects, electropaint-substrate interactions, paint flow and rheological measurements, mechanical properties, and cure of coatings. He has contributed over 40 papers, articles and chapters to coatings literature. Dr. Schoff has led ASTM Subcommittee D.01.24 on Physical Properties of Liquid Paints for over 20 years, has written numerous ASTM test procedures and has championed the use of ASTM standards. He is Chair of the Federation of Societies for Coatings Technology (FSCT) Publications Committee, a member of the Editorial Review Board, one of the technical editors of the Journal of Coatings Technology and Research, and is active in the Pittsburgh Society for Coatings Technology. Dr. Schoff received the ASTM William T. Pearce Award for outstanding contributions to the science of testing paint and paint materials (1987), the ASTM Award of Merit for distinguished service to ASTM and the cause of voluntary standardization (1992) and the 1998 Mattiello Lecture Award, FSCT’s highest technical award. Dr. Schoff will receive the Tess Award on Monday, August 18, 2008, during the 236th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society in Philadelphia, PA.
  • August 2007, George R. Pilcher has been named the recipient of the 2007 Distinguished Service Award of the American chemical society Polymeric Materials Science and Engineering (PMSE) Division. George has been active in PMSE as chair of many symposia. In 1993 he became Chair of PMSE. He served as member on several PMSE committees. In 2001 he was named PMSE Fellow. He was the Technical director of coil and Extrusion Coatings at Akzo Nobel Coatings. In 1996 he received the Baugh Heckel Award from the Federation of Societies for Coatings Technology (FSCT) . In 2004 he delivered the FSCT Mattiello Memorial Address. In 2006 he was the recipient of the American Chemical Society Columbus Section Award for outstanding achievement and promotion of the chemical sciences. From 1988 to 1995 he was President of the Coatings Industry Education Foundation. He currently serves on the Editorial Review Board of the Journal of Coatings Technology Research.
  • July 2007, Professor Zeno W. Wicks Jr. , Professor Emeritus, North Dakota State University, died on June 5, 2007. He was 86. Professor Wicks, who held positions as a research chemist, industry executive and consultant, earned his bachelor’s degree from Oberlin College in 1941 and his doctorate in chemistry from the University of Illinois in 1944. Following a 28-year career with Interchemical Corp., Wicks joined NDSU in 1972, serving as a professor and chair of the Department of Polymers and Coatings. After retiring from NDSU, Wicks was a consultant and taught short courses on coatings. Among his many honors were the 1988 Roy Tess Award in Coatings, the 1986 Mattiello Lecturer Award and four Roon Awards from the Federation of Societies for Coatings Technology.
  • July 2007, Dr. Charles R. Hegedus of Air Products & Chemicals has been named the 2007 recipient of the Federation of Societies for Coatings Technology (FSCT) highest honor—the George Baugh Heckel Award. Presentation of the Heckel Award will be made during the Annual Meeting of the FSCT, October 2, 2007, at the Metro Toronto Convention Center, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Dr. Hegedus has been actively involved in many committees and activities of the FSCT. As Chair of the Publications Committee, he headed the efforts to develop two new FSCT journals: JCT Research and JCT CoatingsTech. For this achievement, he was awarded the FSCT President's Award in 2003. A member of the Editorial Review Board for the original JCT, he now serves on the Management Board and acts as a Technical Editor and Editorial Review Board member for the Journal of Coatings Technology and Research. Dr. Hegedus was named Mattiello Memorial Lecturer of the FSCT in 2003. He has served as chairman of the FSCT Corrosion Committee, Roon Awards Committee, and Mattiello Lecture Committee. He is currently a Trustee of the Coatings Industry Education Foundation and heads the FSCT/University Liaison Committee.
  • May, 2007, Professor John Brady, Chevron Professor of Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, was named the 2007 recipient of the Society of Rheology Bingham Medal. The award will be presented at the 79th Annual Meeting of the Society of Rheology in Salt Lake City, Utah, October 7-11, 2007.
  • March, 2007, Professor Gordon P. Bierwagen, Department of Coatings and Polymeric Materials at North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, will deliver the FSCT 2007 Joseph J. Mattiello Memorial Lecture. His presentation,  entitled "The Physical Chemistry of Organic Coatings Revisited—Viewing Coatings as a Materials Scientist.", will be held during the FSCT FutureCoat! Conference/ICE 2007, October 3–5, 2007, Toronto, Canada.
  • March, 2007, L.E. (Skip) Scriven, Regents Professor of Chemical Engineering & Materials Science at the University of Minnesota, is the winner of the 2007 Roy W. Tess Award in Coatings. The award is given annually by the ACS Division of Polymeric Materials: Science & Engineering and recognizes outstanding achievements in coatings science, technology, and engineering. In the 1970s, Scriven led a research program to understand coating application processes. He and his group used detailed theoretical modeling and experimental flow visualization to get at the crucial operating parameters in industrial coatings flow processes. Since 1990, his attention has been focused on film formation in cross-linking and latex coating systems. Most recently, he has been studying compaction processes and water movement in latex films. Scriven's research has been applied to coil coating processes, paper coatings, ink-jet printers, magnetic and optical disks, photographic films, liquid-crystal displays, automotive finishes, printed circuits, and optical fibers. Scriven will receive the award during the ACS National Meeting in Boston, MA, August 2007.
  • February, 2007, Professor Gregory Tew, Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, University of Massachusetts, is the winner of the 2007 Herman F. Mark Young Scholar Award. Professor Craig Hawker, Director of the Materials Research Laboratory, University of Santa Barbara, is the winner of the 2007 Herman F. Mark Scholar Award. Professor Krzysztof Matyjaszewski, department of Chemistry, Carnegie Mellon University, is the winner of the 2007 Herman F. Mark Senior Scholar Award. 
  • February, 2007, Robert Langer, Institute Professor, Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology is the winner of the 2007 Herman F. Mark Polymer Chemistry Award in recognition of his outstanding research and leadership at the interface of biotechnology and polymer science. A symposium in Professor Langer's honor will be held at the ACS National Meeting, Boston, MA, August 2007.
  • February, 2007, David A. TIRRELL, Ross McCollum-William H. Corcoran Professor, professor of chemistry and chemical engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, was named as a recipient of the American Chemical Society (ACS) Arthur C. Cope Scholar Award for contributions of major significance to chemistry. The Arthur C. Cope Scholar awardees will be honored at the 234th ACS meeting in Boston, August 19-23, 2007.
  • January, 2007, The American Chemical Society (ACS) Division of Polymeric Materials: Science & Engineering (PMSE) has named its 2007 fellows. They are Professor Mohamed El-Aasser,  Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs of Lehigh University; Dr. Wen-Li Wu, NIST Fellow and the Senior Scientist in the Polymers Division of NIST in Gaithersburg, MD; Professor James V. Crivello, Department of Chemistry, Rensselaer Polytechnic institute, Troy, NY and Professor James O. Stoffer,  Professor Emeritus of Chemistry at the University of Missouri-Rolla (UMR). They will be inducted as the eighth class of PMSE Fellows during the PMSE/POLY Awards Reception at the Chicago ACS National Meeting on Monday, March 26, 2007.
  • August 2006, Professor Hershel Markovitz, Emeritus Professor of Mechanics and Polymer Science, Department of Chemistry, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, died on August 29, 2006 in Jerusalem. Professor Markovitz received the 1967 Bingham Medal of the Society of Rheology and was the President of the Society of Rheology (1967-1969). He studied the rheology of polymers and their solutions, normal stress effects and linear viscoelasticity. He created courses in rheology and viscoelasticity and educational films.    
  • August 2006, The FSCT has announced that Richard M. Hille, vice president of operations for The Flood Company, Hudson, Ohio, has been named the 2006 recipient of the organization's highest honor, the George Baugh Heckel Award. Hille served as president of FSCT in 2003-2004. Considered the most prestigious of FSCT awards, the George Baugh Heckel Award honors an individual whose contributions to the organization have been outstanding. Presentation of the Heckel Award will be made at the FSCT Annual
    General Meeting (AGM) on Tuesday, October 31, at the New Orleans Marriott Hotel. The AGM will be held in conjunction with ICE 2006, scheduled for November 1-3, in New Orleans.
  • July 2006, Professor Robert C. Armstrong,  Department of Chemical Engineering, MIT, was named the 2006 recipient of the Society of Rheology Bingham Medal. The award will be presented at the 78th Annual Meeting of the Society of Rheology in Portland, ME, October 2006.
  • May 2006, The rheology community lost a great friend when Dr. Arthur Metzner passed away on May 4, 2006. Dr. Metzner received the Bingham Medal in 1977, served as Editor of the Journal of Rheology from 1985-1995, and received the Distinguished Service Award in 1996.  Dr. Metzner received his B.Sc. degree in chemical engineering from the University of Alberta in 1948 and his Sc.D. from MIT in 1951. After teaching at MIT and Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute, he came to the University of Delaware in 1953 and served as chairman of the Department of Chemical Engineering from 1970 to 1977. His industrial and governmental associations include Air Products, Alyeska Pipeline Service Company, Colgate, the Defense Research Board of Canada and the Canadian Defense Research Establishment, Dow, General Motors, Mobil, Merck, NASA, Union Carbide and Westvaco. His research studies were primarily in the areas of fluid mechanics, heat transfer and the processing of polymers and composites. His 130 research publications earned awards from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, the Society of Rheology, the American Society for Engineering Education and the American Chemical Society. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1979 and received honorary doctorates from the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven and the University of Delaware. His distinction as an educator and researcher was also recognized when he was presented with the University of Delaware's highest faculty honor, the Francis P. Alison Award in 1981. Dr. Metzner served on the advisory councils for chemical engineering at McGill University, MIT, Pennsylvania State University and Princeton University. He also served on the boards or executive committees of the Chemical Heritage Foundation, the American Institute of Physics and the Society of Rheology.
  • April 2006, David A. TIRRELL, Ross McCollum-William H. Corcoran Professor, professor of chemistry and chemical engineering, and chair, division of chemistry and chemical engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, was elected as a new member of The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in recognition of his distinguished and continuing achievements in original research.
  • February 2006, The Division of Polymeric Materials, Science and Engineering of the American Chemical Society has selected five distinguished PMSE members, Dr. Richard Stein of the University of Massachusetts, Dr. Anne Hiltner of Case Western Reserve University, Dr. Robert Weiss of the University of Connecticut, Dr. Robert Miller of IBM and Dr. Donald Plazek of the University of Pittsburgh as the seventh class of PMSE Fellows . They will be inducted during the Awards Lunch at the Atlanta ACS National Meeting on Monday, March 27th, 2006.
  • February 2006, The Federation of Societies for Coatings Technology has announced the selection of Jonathan W. Martin, Group Leader of the Polymeric Materials Group within the Building and Fire Research Laboratory of NIST, to deliver the Joseph J. Mattiello Memorial Lecture during the organization’s 84th Annual Meeting, November 1–3, 2006, at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, New Orleans, LA. Dr. Martin will also be the recipient of the 2006 American Chemical Society,  Division of Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering (PMSE) Roy W. Tess Award. Dr. Martin will receive the award on September 11, 2006 during the 232nd Meeting of the ACS in San Francisco, CA.
  • November 2005, Professor David F. James, University of Toronto, received the 2005 Mason Award of the Canadian Society of Rheology.
  • October 2005, Professor David Boger from the University of Melbourne, Australia received the 2005 Prime Minister's Prize for Science.
  • October 2005, Professor Jan Mewis,  Chemical Engineering Department, K.U.Leuven, Belgium, was named the Society of Rheology 2005 Bingham Medalist. The award was presented at the 77th Annual Meeting of the Society of Rheology in Vancouver, BC, Canada, October 2005.
  • September 2005, The Federation of Societies for Coatings Technology has announced that FSCT Past-President Thomas E. Hill, President and CEO of The Coatings Alliance, has been named the 2005 recipient of the George Baugh Heckel Award. The award will be presented at the opening session of the Federation's 83rd Annual Meeting, Las Vegas, NV, IL on November 6, 2005 
  • September 2005, Professor Ed Vandenberg, Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Arizona state University, passed away on June 11, 2005 at the age of 87. In a remarkably productive career, he made seminal contributions in olefin, epoxide and oxetane polymerization. He held 116 patents and made many discoveries during his 43 year career at Hercules Inc, including the independent discovery of isotactic polypropylene and the discovery and development of catalysts for its manufacture. He discovered and patented the hydrogen chain transfer method of controlling the molecular weight of polyolefins made with Ziegler catalysts. He found a route to phenol based on the air oxidation and acid cleavage of cumene, which is now the preferred manufacturing route. He also did pioneering work in the field of coordination polymerization. Vandenberg has also been active in the ACS Division of Polymer Chemistry. He received numerous awards, including the 2003 ACS Priestly Medal.
  • June 2005, Professor Arthur S. Lodge, Professor Emeritus at The University of Wisconsin, passed away on June 24, 2005. Professor Lodge was a world-renowned expert in rheology. He founded the Rheology Research Center at the University of Wisconsin in 1968. Professor Lodge published two books and over 80 rheology articles. Professor Lodge was awarded the Bingham Medal of the Society of Rheology in 1971 and the Gold Medal of the British Society of Rheology in 1983. In 1992 he was elected to membership in the National Academy of Engineering. His work focused on on-line measurements of polymer melt elasticity and viscosity, high shear rate measurements and the theories of non-linear viscoelastic behavior of polymer melts and concentrated solutions. He invented the Stressmeter, a rheometer for on-line and sample measurements of viscosity and the first normal stress difference.
  • April 2005, The recipient of the 2005 American Chemical Society (ACS) Division of Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering (PMSE) Distinguished Service Award is, Dr. Larry F. Thompson. Dr. Thompson served the PMSE Division and the ACS for over 20 years. He served as the Division’s Chair and held many other positions including Councilor from 1985 through 1992. He was a member of the ACS Board of Directors from 1992 through 1996. Larry F. Thompson is Managing Partner of the Intellectual Property Solutions and Services, LP (IPSS-LP) Consulting Company. He has worked in the semiconductor industry for 35 years in the areas of materials research and semiconductor process development at Bell Laboratories as well as in the semiconductor equipment industry at Integrated Solutions and Ultratech Stepper. He has held senior management positions since 1994 including CTO of Integrated Solutions and a member of the board of directors. At Ultratech Stepper he served as Senior Vice President of Technology and President of the Ultrabeam Lithography Division. As a research engineer at Bell Laboratories he invented, developed and introduced into manufacture several polymeric resist materials used to produce chromium masks including PBS and COP. He managed the group responsible for developing chemically amplified deep-uv resists and was instrumental in developing the 248nm lithography technology. He won the Semiconductor Equipment and Materials Industry Association (SEMI) award for Innovation for this contribution. He has worked in many areas in semiconductor processing including advanced lithography, plasma processing and new materials. In June of 2002, he became CEO and President of the New Jersey Nanotechnology Consortium and was responsible for setting up an independent, for-profit company to capitalize on the Advanced Semiconductor Development Laboratory facilities and personnel of Lucent Technologies, Bell Laboratories. He currently is president of his own consulting business in the area of intellectual property, semiconductor materials, equipment and processing.
  • April 2005, The Federation of Societies for Coatings Technology announced the selection of Dr. Rose Ann Ryntz, Senior Manager and Staff Technical Fellow of Visteon Corporation, to deliver the Joseph J. Mattiello Memorial Lecture during the organization’s 83rd Annual Meeting. The Annual Meeting will be held with the 27th Biennial Western Coatings Societies Symposium, at the Westin Casuarina Hotel and Spa, in Las Vegas, NV, November 6–9, 2005. Dr. Ryntz’s presentation will lead off the WCS Technical Symposium on Monday, November 7. Dr. Ryntz is recognized as one of the world’s leading experts in the area of automotive plastics coatings and has developed new techniques to study paint on plastic performance, including scratch and gouge resistance. An author of over 75 papers and 25 patents in the paint and plastics field, Dr. Ryntz has also written one book, Adhesion to Plastics: Molding and Paintability and edited two books, Plastics and Coatings: Durability, Stabilization, and Testing and Coatings of Polymers and Plastics. She is the author of the monograph, “Painting of Plastics,” in the FSCT Series on Coatings Technology. In recognition of her contributions, Dr. Ryntz has received a number of awards including the 2000 George B. Heckel Award, the FSCT’s highest honor. She was awarded first place in the 2000 FSCT Roon Foundation Award Competition, the 2003 Roy W. Tess Award from the Division of Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering (PMSE) of the American Chemical Society, and the 2004 Women’s Automotive Association International’s Professional Achievement Award. She is also the recipient of the Henry Ford Technology Award and several customer driven quality awards from the Ford Motor Company; the coveted Gold Award and the Outstanding Leadership Award from the Engineering Society of Detroit for contributions to advancing the knowledge of science and engineering. Dr. Ryntz is listed in Strathmore’s Who’s Who in the World.
  • March 2005, The American Chemical Society Division of Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering (PMSE) has named Dr. Eric J. Amis, Chief of the Polymers Division of the National Institute of Standards  and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD and Dr. David J. Lohse, staff member of the Corporate Strategic Research Labs of ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Co., Annandale, NJ for its Fellows Class of 2005. Dr. Amis's research is primarily in the areas of solution rheology combined with light, neutron and X-ray scattering methods to investigate the physics of complex systems such as biomembranes, polyelectrolytes, associating polymers, gels, polymer crystallization, and dendritic polymers. e in metrology for tissue engineering. Dr. Lohse's research focuses on the thermodynamics of mixing polymer blends, neutron scattering from polymers, the use of block and graft copolymers to enhance blend compatibility, the control of rheology by molecular architecture, nanocomposites, and the application of such knowledge to develop improved polymer products.
  • March 2005, Prof. J. Edward Glass of the Polymers and Coatings Department at North Dakota State University will receive the Roy W. Tess Award in Coatings for 2005. Prof. Glass is recognized as one of the world's leading experts in the areas of water-soluble polymers and water-borne coatings. He has published over 175 papers, received 6 patents and edited 7 books, based on symposia organized at American Chemical Society meetings. Dr. Glass will receive the Tess Award from Dr. Benny Freeman, Chair of the PMSE Division, on Monday, August 29, 2005 during the 230th Meeting of the American Chemical Society in Washington, DC. 
  • August 2004, Rose Ryntz, director for Advanced Materials Engineering at Visteon Corp. and a noted authority on coatings for automotive plastics, has been named the 2004 recipient of the Women’s Automotive Association International’s Professional Achievement Award. The award will be presented September 16 at the association’s Professional Award Dinner in Detroit. Ryntz has held key technical positions with Ford Motor Co., DuPont Automotive Coatings and Akzo Coatings. She has published more than 75 articles, edited or co-authored three books, and been awarded 28 patents. She also has won the American Chemical Society’s Roy W. Tess Award in Coatings and the FSCT’s highest honor, the George Baugh Heckel Award.
  • July 2004, Don Brookfield Sr., founder of Brookfield Engineering Laboratories, Inc., Middleboro, MA, passed away May 24, 2004 after an extended illness. Don Brookfield Sr. built and sold his first dial-reading viscometer in 1934. Later with his father and brother Bernard, he incorporated the business and launched the Brookfield dial reading synchro-electric viscometer. That instrument would become the standard throughout the world. After WWII the American Standard for Testing and Materials (ASTM) developed standards for viscosity measurement using the Brookfield dial reading synchro-electric viscometer. Brookfield viscometers are used today in a broad range of applications, encompassing research and development and quality control.
  • July 2004, John Casola, Product Sales Manager, Malvern Instruments, has been named 2003 Person of the Year by the Association of Modified Asphalt Producers.
  • July 2004, Professor Christopher W. Macosko was selected as the 2004 recipient of the Bingham Medal of the Society of Rheology. Macosko, professor of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science at the University of Minnesota, is an expert in the field of reactive polymer rheology and the author of two books. Professor Macosko received the 1988 Stine Award from the AIChE and the Pall Award for Applied Polymer Research in 1997. In 2001 Macosko was elected to the National Academy of Engineering. The Bingham Award will be presented to Macosko at the 76th Annual Meeting of the Society of Rheology, February 13-17, 2005.
  • July 2004, The Federation of Societies for Coatings Technology has announced that Ray A. Dickie, Editor of JCT Research and JCT CoatingsTech, has been named the recipient of the George Baugh Heckel Award. The award will be presented at the opening session of the Federation's 82nd Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL on October 27, 2004 
  • June 2004, Brookfield Engineering Laboratories is celebrating its 70th Anniversary. Brookfield has recently acquired the Texture Analysis Divsion of CNS Farnell. 
  • March 2004, The American Chemical Society Division of Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering (PMSE) selected Professor Nikos Hadjichristidis, Department of Chemistry, University of Athens, Greece,  Professor Bill MacKnight,  Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, University of Massachusetts and Don Schulz, Senior Scientific Advisor at the Corporate Strategic Research Laboratories of ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Co. in Annandale, NJ, as the fifth class of PMSE Fellows. They were inducted during the Awards Lunch at the Anaheim ACS Meeting on  March 29, 2004
  • March 2004, Dr. Ray A. Dickie, Editor of JCT Research and JCT CoatingsTech has been honored by the Adhesion society and the American Chemical Society Division of Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering. Dr. Dickie was named a Robert L. Patrick Fellow of the Adhesion Society at the 25th Annual Meeting, February 15-18, 2004, Wilmington, NC,  and will receive the 2004 Distinguished Service Award from the ACS PMSE Division at the 227th National Meeting, March 28-April 1, 2004, Anaheim, CA.
  • February 2004, The Federation of Societies for Coatings Technology has announced the selection of George R. Pilcher, Technical Director, Akzo Nobel Coatings Inc., Columbus, OH, to deliver the Joseph J. Mattiello Lecture during the 82nd FSCT Meeting, October 27-29, 2004, Chicago, IL.  
  • December 2003, California Polytechnic State University (Cal Poly), San Luis Obispo, California, unveiled plans for the construction of the Western Coatings Technology Center. The technology center will be a part of the university's new $134 million Center for Science and Mathematics. Construction is expected to begin in 2006, with completion anticipated in 2008.
  • November 2003, Hydan Technologies, Inc. has relocated to 5 Ilene Court, Building 7, Suite 17, Hillsborough, New Jersey.
  • November 2003, Malvern Instruments Ltd., a unit of Spectris plc,  acquired Bohlin Instruments Ltd. Malvern Instruments is a supplier of particle characterization instruments. Bohlin Instruments is a supplier of rheology measurement systems.
  • August 2003,  Gerry J. Gough, Quality Manager for ICI Packaging Coatings Ltd., Birmingham, England, has been named the 2003 recipient of The Federation of Societies for Coatings Technology (FSCT) highest honor—the George Baugh Heckel Award. Presentation of the Heckel Award will be made at the Opening Session of the Federation’s 81st Annual Meeting, at the Pennsylvania Convention Center, in Philadelphia, PA on November 13, 2003.
  • July 2003, The Bingham medal of the Society of Rheology for 2003 will be awarded at the Pittsburgh meeting to Professor Giuseppe Marrucci, professor of chemical engineering, department of chemical engineering, University of Naples, Naples, Italy, for his contributions in the fields of entangled polymers, liquid crystals and liquid crystalline polymers, constitutive equations and non-Newtonian fluid mechanics, dilute polymer solutions and his service to the rheological community.
    February 17, 2003, Rose A. Ryntz, manager and staff technical fellow with Visteon Corp., will receive the 2003 Roy W. Tess Award in Coatings of the ACS Division of Polymeric Materials: Science & Engineering. She will receive the award in September at the ACS national meeting in New York City.
  • February 14, 2003, The National Academy of Engineering (NAE) has elected 77 new members and nine foreign associates. Among the new members are Glenn H. Fredrickson,Ronald G. Larson, department chair and G.G. Brown Professor of Chemical Engineering, department of chemical engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, for elucidating the flow properties of complex fluids at the molecular and continuum levels through theory and experiment, Dudley A. Saville, Stephen C. Macaleer '63 Professor of Engineering and Applied Science, Princeton University, Princeton, N.J, for advancing our understanding of electrokinetic and electrohydrodynamic processes and their application to the assembly of colloidal arrays and Giuseppe Marrucci, professor of chemical engineering, department of chemical engineering, University of Naples, Naples, Italy, for contributions to the molecular modeling and thermodynamics of polymeric systems and for furthering our understanding of their transport processes.
  • January 27, 2003, Clayton J. Radke, professor at the University of California, Berkeley will receive the ACS Award in Colloid Chemistry. Employing a multidisciplinary approach, Radke studies phenomena where phase boundaries dictate system behavior. He uses a combination of molecular thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, transport phenomena, and reaction engineering. His significant contributions to the field include the measurement and characterization of oscillatory forces in thin films of micelles; development of the "thin-film balance" experimental method for measuring isotherms of a single foam film; models for superspreading, enzyme kinetics, protein adsorption, and flow electrification at surfaces; and insights into thermodynamic effects on adsorption. He is particularly proud of research leading to fundamental understanding of thin foam films and their behavior in porous media. In addition, Radke's group, in collaboration with the Berkeley School of Optometry, is working to design better soft contact lenses for extended wear. Radke has published more than 170 articles in technical journals. Radke received the Donald Sterling Noyce Prize for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching in 1993 and the Distinguished Teaching Award in 1994, both from UC Berkeley. He was also voted Most Appreciated Faculty Member in 1993 and received the Outstanding Faculty Award in 2002 from the school's American Institute of Chemical Engineers student chapter.
  • January 27, 2003, Guy C. Berry, University Professor of Chemistry and Polymer Science of Carnegie Mellon University, Frank E. Karasz, Distinguished University Professor and Silvio O. Conte Distinguished Professor of Polymer Science at the University of Massachusetts, Moshe Narkis,  Professor of Chemical Engineering at the Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Dennis G. Peiffer,  Senior Scientist in the Corporate Strategic Research Laboratory of the ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company in Clinton, New Jersey, Virgil Percec, P. Roy Vagelos Professor of Chemistry at the University of Pennsylvania and Ken Wagener, George B. Butler Professor of Polymer Chemistry in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Florida have been chosen as the ACS Division of Polymeric Materials: Science & Engineering (PMSE) Fellows for 2003. Fellows will be inducted at the ACS National Meeting in New Orleans, March 24, 2003.
  • January 2003, The Federation of Societies for Coatings Technology (FSCT) named Dr. Charles R. Hegedus, of Air Products & Chemicals, to present the 2003 Joseph J. Mattiello Memorial Lecture during the FSCT Annual Meeting, November 12-14, 2003 in Philadelphia, PA.
  • 10/14/02, Waters Corporation agreed to pay $17 million in cash for the rheology business unit of Rheometric Scientific Inc. Waters also would assume $6 million in debt upon acquiring the business, which provides instruments and services to test the physical properties of liquids and other substances. The deal, expected to be completed before the end of the year, is subject to Rheometric stockholder, creditor and regulatory approval. With the acquisition, Waters expects to more than double its share in the rheology instrumentation market, valued at $70 million to $80 million. Waters said the Rheometric Scientific business will be merged with its New Castle, Del., subsidiary, TA Instruments Inc., and bring in about $20 million a year in sales. Rheometric Scientific said it will use proceeds from the sale to pay down debt and other obligations and to fuel its life sciences business.
  • 7/30/02, Freidun Anwari, Technical Director, for Kelly-Moore Paint Co., Inc., San Carlos, CA and FSCT Bylaws Committee Chair, was named 2002 Recipient of FSCT Heckel Award.Presentation of the Heckel Award will be made at the Opening Session of the Federation’s Annual Meeting, at the Morial Convention Center, in New Orleans, LA, on October 30, 2002. The Heckel Award recognizes the outstanding contributions that an individual has made to the Federation’s interest and prestige. www.coatingtech.org
  • July 2002, The Bingham medal of the Society of Rheology for 2002 will be awarded at the Minneapolis meeting to Professor Ronald G. Larson, Granger Brown Professor and Head of the Department of Chemical Engineering of the University of Michigan. Professor Larson has contributed to both the research and educational literature of the field. Inspection of his publication list demonstrates convincingly that he has advanced in central ways most of the important branches of current rheological research. Professor Larson is a “Renaissance Man” of rheology, excelling in molecular and continuum theory, molecular simulation, and experiment. His list of achievements includes other “firsts” as well, such as his discovery (together with Muller and Shaqfeh) of a new viscoelastic instability in Taylor-Couette flow. His recent book, The Structure and Rheology of Complex Fluids (Oxford, 1999), should become at least as influential as his earlier one. He served effectively as president of the Society of Rheology and has been an influential mentor to younger rheologists.
  • 5/20/02, Mohamed S. El-Aasser, Dean of the P. C. Rossin College of Engineering & Applied Science at Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pa., will receive the 2002 Roy W. Tess Award in Coatings. The award is given annually by the ACS Division of Polymeric Materials: Science & Engineering and will be awarded on Aug. 19 during the 224th ACS national meeting in Boston. El-Aasser has contributed to a wide range of topics related to polymers, colloids, and coatings. His vigorous research program in these fields has been sustained for 30 years and has resulted in more than 300 publications, 380 presentations and lectures, nine patents, and six edited books. He is particularly noted for his distinguished research in the areas of polymer latexes and emulsion polymerization.
  • 5/17/2002, Dr. John Gerlock, Senior Staff Technical Specialist, Ford Research Laboratories, will present the Joseph J. Mattiello Memorial Lecture during the organization’s 80th Annual Meeting, October 30-November 1, 2002, in New Orleans, LA. Dr. Gerlock is well known for his innovative studies on the development of a means to anticipate the long-term weathering performance of modern automotive paint systems. He initiated research on the migration and longevity of stabilizing additives such as ultraviolet light absorbers (UVAs), and was the first to determine that UVAs were consumed during coating weathering, leading to a loss of protection. His research is based on the premise that it should be possible to relate the chemical composition changes that occur in automotive paint systems during outdoor exposure to their long-term weathering performance and thereby greatly augment the information afforded by traditional weathering performance metrics. Therefore, he developed a method to measure the rate of formation of free radicals during the earliest stages of paint weathering under natural exposure conditions. Dr. Gerlock is currently working towards developing what he calls a “trustworthy accelerated weathering test.” FTIR measurements have been carried out on isolated clearcoats exposed in Florida, Arizona, and a wide variety of accelerated weathering tests in order to compare degradation chemistries. Results indicate that distorted weathering chemistry can contribute to false accelerated weathering test results and go on to indicate that mismatch between artificial light spectral power distribution and sunlight is an important consideration. Currently, an attempt is being made to verify this contention and encourage the development of light sources whose spectral power distribution matches sunlight’s more closely in the UV region. Dr. Gerlock’s influence is evident throughout the automotive and coatings industries. He has provided extensive training to supplier engineers in the use and interpretation of chemically-based durability testing for automotive paint systems. He has also directly influenced the design coating resin systems and the formulation of automotive enamels by documenting the effects of resin structural changes on coating performance and the effects of stabilizer and UV absorber permanence on long-term coating weathering performance. Dr. Gerlock’s work has resulted in a new, fundamental understanding of paint weathering and stabilization. It has led to the development and use of chemically-based paint weathering tests at Ford and at all major paint suppliers to the industry. Dr. Gerlock is the recipient of four Henry Ford Technical Achievement Awards, two Henry Ford Technology Awards, and the Thomas Midgley Award for his research on paint weathering. He has published 43 papers on various aspects of the topic and presented research results at 73 invited lectures around the world.
  • April 2002, Paar Physica USA, announced that Don Becker has joined the company as Director of Sales and Marketing. Becker brings to the Paar Physica team over 16 years of experience in the rheological marketplace. Most recently, Becker held positions as Vice President of Sales and Marketing, and Managing Director, USA of Rheometric Scientific, Inc.
  • Thermohaake has announced the Young Scientists Award 2002. Participants are invited to submit their scientific papers by August 15, 2002. An international jury board, experienced scientists from industrial environments, will select the most innovative contributions. The winners will be invited to give a plenary lecture at RheoFuture, the international forum for material characterization, in Karlsruhe, December 2-3, 2002. www.rheofuture.de
  • The Award Committee of the European Society of Rheology (ESR) has decided to bestow the third Weissenberg Award, 2002, to Professor Ken Walters. The award will be presented on September 2, 2002 at the 6th European Rheology Congress, Erlangen, Germany
  • 12/10/01, Rheometric Scientific has been named the winner of the 2001 New Jersey Small Business Development Center's (NJSBDC) Manufacturing Success award. As part of the Mentor/Protege program, Rheometric Scientific was recognized by the NJSBDC for its successful entrepreneurial spirit in 2001, which included the acquisition of two complementary companies that will allow it to expand its business in the life science market as well as increased emphasis on new product development designed to re-shape rheological and thermal analysis systems. www.rheosci.com
  • 8/27/01, Rheometric Scientific introduced the RheoPro, designed to study the properties of thermosets as they cure, such as epoxy resins, rubbers, cements, powder coatings, and gelatin. The Rheopro provides Quality Control data for manufacturers of viscous pastes, creams, lotions, and foodstuffs. Designed to be small and compact, the RheoPro comes with easy-to-use software, and has no special power or air requirements. Disposable probes are ideal for following curing reactions, and a choice of environmental control options allow the RheoPro to simulate a variety of process conditions. www.rheosci.com